Recently in Japan Category

Update on Japan Disaster

|

As the people of Japan continue to struggle in the aftermath of the devastating earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear threat, we are relieved to report that all our colleagues in Japan, including Seacology Japan Board Members and our 2007 Seacology Prize Winner, survived the disaster.

With our affiliate office in Japan, Seacology has created a Japanese Disaster Relief Fund to support relief efforts in the country. In the spirit of Seacology, we are working to identify a project where our funds will have the biggest possible impact. We will continue to update you on these efforts as we continue to keep our Japanese partners and the entire island in our thoughts.

Below is a letter from Seacology's Chairman and Founder, Dr. Paul Cox, about this great tragedy. If you would like to support the Seacology Japanese Disaster Relief Fund, you may donate online or by check, with a note indicating that you would like to support the fund for Japan. All donations will be directed entirely towards relief efforts. 

DSCF8732.jpgFrom left to right: Seacology Executive Director Duane Silverstein, founding Seacology Japan board member Akemi Yoshida, 2007 Seacology Prize Recipient Kokichi Kariya, Seacology Development Director Susan Racanelli, and founding Seacology Japan board member Akemi Chiba. Photo taken en route to visit Kariya san's project in Fuzawa Village, Japan.

Mr. Kokichi Kariya
Mr. Kokichi Kariya

On Wednesday, October 3, Seacology will be celebrating the accomplishments of the 2007 Seacology Prize recipient, Kokichi Kariya of Fuzawa, Japan. The Seacology Prize is awarded annually to an indigenous islander for exceptional achievement in preserving the environment and culture of any of the world's 100,000-plus islands.

To honor this heroic gentleman, Seacology is hosting a special awards ceremony at the St. Francis Yacht Club on San Francisco Bay. Mr. Kariya has spent 42 years in a tireless struggle to save one of the few remaining ancient forests on Honshu Island, Japan. At great personal sacrifice he has challenged aggressive logging companies as well as local, regional and national governments to protect the virgin beech trees of Fuzawa, Japan.